July 26, 2018

Information for Presenters

Notice: In order to meet the needs of our instructors during the uncertain COVID-19 situation, the conference is in process of being moved to an online format.  This page will be updated as we have more details to share.  Last updated 2/1/2021. 

Please visit www2.gmu.edu/coronavirus for University updates.


Information for Presenters

We look forward to seeing you online at this year’s Innovations in Teaching & Learning Conference (ITL)!

As a reminder, an at-a-glance conference schedule can be found on the conference schedule page (you should have also received an email with a link to a detailed presenter schedule list).  Your session details, session day/time, and presenter information (names and bios) will be published in the Sched App for the conference and in the conference proceedings. Please plan to check the Sched App the day of for any presenter updates/unexpected link or time changes. Specific presenter directions can be found below by session type. Please contact the Stearns Center’s Events Manager, Ashley Joiner with any logistical concerns (ajoiner2@gmu.edu) or the 2021 Conference Director, Laura Lukes, Ph.D., with any session “lesson plan” concerns ( llukes@gmu.edu).

We kindly require that you register for the conference, regardless of how much of the conference you are able to attend. Registration is FREE this year!  Having all presenters registered helps us for a number of bookkeeping and logistical reasons, including confirming your intent to show up for your session. If you have questions or concerns about registering, please call the Stearns Center for Teaching and Learning (703-993-6200) or email stearns@gmu.edu. Please help spread the word by encouraging faculty and graduate instructors in your department or program to register and attend.


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Synchronous Workshop and Panel/Roundtable Presentations

After a great deal of consideration of the conference goalsand community feedback, we have decided that live/synchronous sessions will NOT be recorded.  We want live sessions to be interactive experiences in which participants have opportunities to connect meaningfully with each other—feeling comfortable to share their teaching-related experiences or try out new ideas without the additional stress of being recorded.  We encourage live/synchronous presenters to consider the types of resources that would be most valuable to share on the ITL Conference Proceedings site after the event for both session attendees and non-attendees in lieu of a session recording–think of this as a 1 page document that summarizes the key take aways and ideas that were shared by participants (names removed).  Possible alternatives will be discussed in the Presenter Preparation Sessions.

Like previous years, live synchronous sessions will have a session host who will start and close the session.  With the new online format, there will be some ITL conference slides open at the start of your session to visually welcome participants to the conference and your session.  Session hosts will open the session for you with a general ITL welcome statement, explain the format and logistics of the session, and introduce you (referencing the bio information you provided for the conference proceedings—you can view your bio information in the ITLCP link above).  During the session, they will help by keeping time and monitoring the chat box for your session. You will also have a tech host (if no tech host is available, the session host will serve in this role) who will monitor the waiting room, manage muting or removing disruptive participants, help with Zoom features like breakout groups if you are having trouble, etc.  The session host will wrap up the session for you by thanking you and the participants and sharing a few ITL conference announcements (including evaluation).

We ask that you please sign up to attend one of our presenter preparation sessions (TBD) to learn what to expect for session support, test your equipment (test signal strength/quality, sound–be sure to attend from where you will be the day of), practice the online interaction tools (sharing screen, polling, breakout groups, etc.), and your presentation materials (to ensure they are displaying as you would like).  We also ask that you connect with your session host/tech host at least once prior to the conference–share with them your session plan/which Zoom features you’ll be using and to work out how you would like to be introduced and what kind of help you want with Zoom tools.  We will send you the name of your assigned session/tech host(s)–please see your email.  You may wish to schedule a time with them prior to the event to practice or provide them with additional introduction material or session support instructions.

DAY OF YOUR SESSION: Please also plan to log in your session 20-30 minutes before the start of your session time (no later than 15 minutes before the session start time) to ensure your connection is working, to touch base with the session host introducing you, and to address any last-minute setup concerns. As you tweak your presentation plan, we encourage you to make your session an active learning experience and plan time for interaction or discussion amongst the participants. The online format has some fantastic affordances: real-time participant polling, breakout groups (assigned or random), virtual dry erase board, ability to pair with shared online documents for co-creation and brainstorming, backchannel conversation through the chat box, etc.).  Note: Virtual rooms will be setup with a waiting room and to mute participants upon entry.  Your tech host will be monitoring the waiting room and will let participants in.

Please review the Presenter Preparation PowerPoint, ITL Zoom Synchronous Sessions Strategies, and the  ITL Synchronous Session and Planning Guide.

If you wish to publish any supplementary materials (links, handouts, videos, etc.) to be available pre- and/or post-conference via the ITL Conference Proceedings site, please submit through this link: http://library.gmu.edu/publishing/submit. (Please include name, session title and proposal number)

Zoom tutorial videos and resources


On Demand Pre-Recorded Presentations

On-Demand Pre-Recorded Video Presentations and Other Digital Presentations:

These “sessions” will be posted before the start of the conference on Monday, September 20th and be available anytime to participants via the Sched Conference App and to the general public through the open-access ITL Conference Proceedings Online Journal.  

Please review the Presenter Preparation PowerPoint and the ITL On-Demand (asynchronous) session planning guide.  If you are submitting a digital poster or some other content, please see the poster section below. With an online conference format, we ask that you make your recording and submit via the link provided below prior to the conference ideally by (TBD) so we have time to review content, ensure that it displays properly and so that it is available to participants through the entire conference week. The hard deadline for submitting materials is (TBD).  We will try to post anything submitted after that date, but cannot guarantee it will be posted in time for the live portion of the conference.

We encourage you to sign up to attend one of our On-Demand presenter preparation sessions (TBD) to help answer your conference format options.

We are currently exploring On Demand “Watch parties” during our daily mid-day social events and the possibility of asynchronous commenting options. A “watch party” involves screening/showing your On-Demand video live by sharing your screen via Zoom and then leading an informal discussion about it with attendees. If you are interested in hosting a “Watch party” via Zoom for your session materials, please let our Events Manager, Ashley Joiner, know (ajoiner2@gmu.edu). 

Please submit your recorded presentation through this link: http://library.gmu.edu/publishing/submit

If you wish to publish any supplementary materials (links, handouts, videos, etc.), please also submit through the above link. (Please include name, session title and proposal number)

Zoom tutorial videos and resources


Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) Lightning Talk and Roundtable Presenters

How does a lightning talk session work? (Tentative plan) During the online SoTL Showcase session, each presenter will only have 5 minutes to present their slides/study—it’s a bit of fun competition to see who can finish before the 5-minute bell signal. After everyone has presented (~45 minutes), then the session will shift into a roundtable session facilitated by Kelly Schrum, Ph.D., in which presenters will answer questions from the participants and elaborate on their work in more detail.

What should be on my slides?  The goal is to include primarily key images or data visualizations and no more than 7 words on each slide.  Because the presentations are being compiled, be sure to include your name and title on your first slide.  Some presenters chose to have a single slide with their name, title, and a single visual.  If you wish to publish any supplementary materials (links, handouts, videos, etc.) to be available pre and/or post conference through the ITL Conference Proceedings, please submit through this link: http://library.gmu.edu/publishing/submit. If you would like to see an example lightning talk, please email llukes@gmu.edu.

Sounds great—what do I need to do next?  We are excited about this unique type of session too! Please double check the detailed presenter schedule (coming soon) to see if you requested to do a lightning talk only or both a lightning talk and an On-Demand resource.  In order to make this synchronous session work logistically, we ask that you please send Kelly Schrum your slides one week before the conference (TBD) so that she can assemble all of the presenter slides into one continuous presentation. You will receive an email with more specific directions from her in the next few weeks.

Please review ITL Zoom Synchronous Sessions Strategies and the  ITL Synchronous Session and Planning Guide.

Please review the ITL On-Demand (asynchronous) session planning guide.

Zoom tutorial videos and resources


Digital Poster Presentations

With an online conference format, we ask that you save your poster as a PDF and submit via the link provided below prior to the conference (TBD) so that it is available to participants through the entire conference week.

SUGGESTED POSTER GUIDELINES & TIPS

ITL may not be like your typical discipline conference poster session—be creative and use your imagination. Common approaches to an ITL poster include thinking of it as a big one page handout for people about your project or resource, a visual diagram of your thought process around designing teaching activities, or a visual signpost for starting an in person conversation. Below are some suggested guidelines based on past posters, but please feel free to go in your own direction.

Mason Resource Posters: Think of this a one page infographic handout for instructors (by submitting the PDF of you poster, you have a handout to link people to). Key information: name of resource; where to find it in person/online; why an instructor needs it/how it can help them; description of what it is; data/examples showing impact of using resource (optional)

Course or Activity Re/Design Posters: Think of this as a visual before/after demonstration of your activity/assignment or course plan. Key information: What learning problems were you trying to solve with this curriculum? (learning goals, outcomes); context (course/population/semester year); examples of the learning support activities/assignments that helped students build and practice skills and knowledge; examples of assessment activities to determine if the curriculum was successful at reaching learning goals; annotations or examples of what you were doing before vs. after and why you made those changes; consider including student sample work; lessons learned and/or tips and implications for others who will try it or adapt it

Curriculum Map Posters: Think of this as a visual roadmap of your course or your program’s curriculum. Key information: What learning problems were you trying to solve with this curriculum? (learning goals, outcomes); context (course/population/semester year); examples of the learning support activities/assignments that helped students build and practice skills and knowledge; examples of assessment activities to determine if the curriculum was successful at reaching learning goals; lessons learned and/or tips and implications for others who will try it or adapt it

Example Activity or Assignment Showcase Posters: Think of this as a visual ad for your activity. Key information: What learning problem were you trying to solve with this activity? (learning goals, outcomes); context (course/population/semester year); brief description of activity/assignment; samples of assignment and student work (what does this activity look like in practice); lessons learned and/or tips and implications for others who will try it or adapt it for their classes

SoTL Posters: Think of this as a typical research poster. Key information: Research question; context (course/population/semester year); methods; results; key take aways and implications for others in their teaching practice

Other: Use your imagination!

Looking for more tips on how to design your poster for this type of conference? Sign up for one of the On-Demand presentation preparation sessions (see email for directions) or email the 2020 Conference Director, Dr. Laura Lukes at llukes@gmu.edu to discuss ideas.

Please submit your poster PDF through this link: http://library.gmu.edu/publishing/submit

You aren’t limited to one item.  If you wish to publish any supplementary materials (links, handouts, videos, etc.), please also submit through the above link.

Please also review the ITL On-Demand (asynchronous) session planning guide.

 


Watch Party Conversation Leaders

You don’t need to prepare or submit anything. We simply ask that you log into the Watch Party Conversation Session at least 15 Minutes prior to the start of the session to ensure that your equipment/connection works and we can assign you to breakout rooms.  During the session, we ask that you share your screen to show the video and get the conversation going and point people to the Stearns Center website resources if they aren’t familiar with them.

If you wish to share any of your relevant materials (links, handouts, videos, etc.) that may or do come up in these informal conversations, please submit through this link: http://library.gmu.edu/publishing/submit

Please review ITL Zoom Synchronous Sessions Strategies and the  ITL Synchronous Session and Planning Guide.

Please review the ITL On-Demand (asynchronous) session planning guide.

Zoom tutorial videos and resources


Zoom Tutorial Videos

Zoom tutorial videos and resources

Tips for knowing who is attending your session and why 

  • SC session host will be asking people to connect via the chatbox as part of the conference welcome—consider adding to this in the session by asking them to share their motivation for attending your session in the chatbox (after you introduce yourself) 
  • Ask them (or ask the SC session host) to change their screen name to include their college/school or preferred pronouns  
  • TECHNICAL NOTE: they can do this by clicking on three dot button next to unmute button on their picture and choose rename option; they can also change their profile picture for the session in this menu too) 
  • Consider running 1-2 quick poll questions at the start asking about their familiarity with the topic or discipline or motivation for attending (send poll questions in advance to your tech host so they can set these up for you) 
  • TECHNICAL NOTE: Only the Zoom meeting host can set up poll questions—that is your assigned SC Tech host by default.  You can ask to be made Zoom Meeting host the day of if you prefer to create poll questions that day. 

Tips for using the chat box: 

  • Leverage your session host’s presence—ask them to monitor the chatbox and answer any questions or direct to you during session so you can focus on what you are saying/engaging participants rather than monitoring the chat 
  • Ask participants at the start of session to put questions in the chatbox—this allows you to keep the flow of the session, while periodically addressing questions or comments when relevant 
  • Use the chatbox as a participant reflection tool—ask everyone to take a minute to think of (and share in chatbox) an example in their course or one thing they want to try after learning from your session—you can ask them to type it in chat, but not click send until you give a signal so everyone has a chance to draft something 
  • TECHNICAL NOTE: The default setting will be that chat messages will be viewable to everyone (your tech host is there to monitor chat for inappropriate messages and has been instructed to remove anyone disrupting the session). 
  • TECHNICAL NOTE: Participants can only see the chat content from the time they enter the room.  So, if anyone joins late, after you have already posted a link, you will need to repost it so they can see it.  We recommend asking the SC session host to periodically repost or send a repost message directly to the latecomers. 

Tips for using breakout rooms: 

  • Have a plan for the number of participants in your breakout groups ahead of time, 2-4 is ideal to make sure everyone gets a chance to share (and consider if you have a small or large group attend).   
  • Time goes by superfast and people need time to introduce themselves and connect—build in 5 mins to your breakout activity to account for that. 
  • Pre-decide if you want groups to be randomly assigned or assigned by you during session or “picked” by participants—there are different logistics to make each option work smoothly, see technical notes below. 
  • Give directions (on screen, in chatbox and spoken) before putting participants in breakout rooms 
  • Consider providing a link to a shared document or shared slides before putting participants in breakout rooms 
  • Include breakout group activity directions at the top of the shared document (so participants can get started right away) 
  • Consider including a space for “recorder” and “presenter” at the top of the breakout group if activity involves either, so group can decide this upfront, rather than negotiate in front of whole group later 
  • Consider having a shared folder that contains shared documents so participants can easily go between items rather than clicking on many links 
  • For longer breakout activities, plan to pop into groups to see if they need help.  Session hosts can assist latecomers in the main room. 
  • Schedule/send 2 minute notice messages to breakout rooms (see Zoom tool FAQs on website) and decide in advance who in your presenter team will do this and when 
  • Be prepared for having 10-100 people in your session—you may want to have two plans for activities depending on participant size 
  • Note: When you send participants into breakout groups, the silence and not being able to see what groups are doing can feel weird. 
  • TECHNICAL NOTE: The SC Tech host assigned to your session is the “Zoom meeting host” by default.  Only the Zoom host can assign/move people into breakout groups, see who is in which breakout group (and move individuals), and can send a message to the breakout groups.  You can ask the SC Tech host to manage breakout groups for you OR you can ask them to make you or your team member the Zoom host so that you or your team member can manage breakout groups. 
  • TECHNICAL NOTE: The SC Tech host/Zoom meeting host will make presenters and SC session host Zoom meeting co-hosts.  Zoom cohosts will be randomly assigned in breakout groups if you choose the random assignment option—meaning that the Zoom host will need to manually move them if they are leading a specific breakout group or move other participants into a new group if they are paired with cohosts who are not participating in the breakout group activities. Zoom cohosts can also move themselves out of breakout groups once everyone is put in breakout groups. 
  • TECHNICAL NOTE: Once in breakout groups, anything put in chat can only be seen by others in that specific breakout room.  So, if you are in the main room and post something in the chatbox, no one in the breakout rooms will see it.  We recommend posting any breakout group activity directions in chatbox BEFORE you move participants into breakout groups.  (Chat works within the breakout group, but other groups can’t see what was shared during the breakout group time.)  
  • TECHNICAL NOTE: If you want participants to choose a breakout group… 
  • OPTION A: ask them to change their screenname (click on three dot button next to unmute button on their picture and choose rename option) to their discipline or breakout group topic—then have a team member or tech host who is serving as Zoom host assign them to breakout groups while you are presenting/giving activity directions 
  • OPTION B: ask them to “sign up” for a breakout group topic at the start of the session on a shared document or in the chatbox —then have a team member or tech host who is serving as Zoom host assign them to breakout groups while you are presenting/giving activity directions 
  • TECHNICAL NOTE: Breakout groups can use a virtual whiteboard, but it requires someone in the breakout group to share their screen (selecting virtual white board to share) in order for this to work. 

Tips for using polling: 

  • Consider having a test question up at the start to get to know participants and to work out bugs before the heart of your content 
  • Consider using an external polling tool like Poll Everywhere that allows for real time open-ended responses—give participants a short time (2-3 minutes) to respond and narrate the responses with your expert commentary as they come in 
  • Consider using the chatbox like a polling tool for open ended questions 
  • Conserve your session time and ask yourself if a poll question is necessary or adds significantly to the experience.  Could the raise your hand tool in the participant list or asking for a visual nod or headshake suffice?   
  • Be sure to share the results or comment on to connect explicitly to the session content 
  • TECHNICAL NOTE: Both Zoom meeting host (SC Tech host by default) and Zoom co-hosts (presenters, SC session host) can launch the poll, but only the host can create one.  This means that co-hosts can also accidently close the poll before you are done collecting responses.  Make sure to remind anyone with a co-host label not to touch the poll while you are running it. 

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Tips for using annotation tool/virtual white board 

  • If you want to be able to annotate, but don’t want participants to be able to, ask your Tech host to adjust that setting in Zoom for you. 
  • You can annotate on the white board or anything else you are sharing (like slides/images), but you can’t share a word document and have everyone edit it like a shared document. 
  • TECHNICAL NOTE: Breakout groups can use a virtual whiteboard, but it requires someone in the breakout group to share their screen (selecting virtual white board to share) in order for this to work. 

Tips for keeping things on schedule: 

  • Plan your session to the minute and practice—ask a friend to try the activity and see how long it really takes them or see how long it takes you and double it.  Write out the minute-by-minute agenda and share with co-presenters and SC Tech and session hosts 
  • Leverage your SC session host’s support—ask them to give you specific time cues. 
  • Use a timer for individual or breakout group activities and provide 2 minute warnings or share your screen (or ask session or tech host to share screen with a visual timer) 
  • Consider having groups or individuals record work in a shared document so all responses are visible, but you can be selective on any reporting out  
  • Allowing participants to use their mic or share screen create a greater sense of community during the session, but can take additional time to transition and navigate tool use—include 5-10 minutes to each activity you plan to do this in 
  • Have a shared folder or documents, including copies of any materials you plan to share by sharing your screen (especially if participants are calling in due to tech issues), that way people can follow along even if screen sharing isn’t working as you’d planned 

Tips for an unexpectedly large group of participants: 

  • Anticipate it and have a backup plan for a large group—having a shared folder or documents is especially helpful here, including copies of any materials you plan to share by sharing your screen (especially if participants are calling in due to tech issues) 
  • Don’t be intimidated!  They’re there because they want to hear what you have to share on the subject and you were selected for the program because you have something to share for the benefit of all. 
  • Zoom is pretty stable, but you may want to ask the tech host to turn off participant video feed if things start slowing down or freezing 
  • You can still do breakout groups—consider doing quick think-pair-share activities or use partners (breakout groups of 2-3) instead of larger breakout groups for more involved activities 
  • Consider changing to poll-based activities instead of open-ended ones 
  • Consider changing to individual reflection activities instead of larger working groups 

Tips for an unexpectedly small group of participants: 

  • Anticipate it and have a backup plan for a small group—having a couple “extension” activities prepared can be handy since you will gain time in your session because there won’t be as much time needed for transition or volume of participant responses