July 26, 2018

Information for Presenters


Information for Presenters

We look forward to seeing you at this year’s Innovations in Teaching & Learning Conference (ITL)!

As a reminder, your presentation room location, presentation time, and presenter information (names and bios) are published in the conference proceedings. Please plan to check this site the day of for any presenter updates/unexpected room changes. Specific presenter directions can be found below by session type. Please contact the conference director with any concerns (703-993-5743 or llukes@gmu.edu).

We kindly require that you register for the conference, regardless of how much of the conference you are able to attend. Having all presenters registered helps us for a number of bookkeeping and logistical reasons, including confirming your intent to show up for your session. If you have questions or concerns about registering, please call the Stearns Center for Teaching and Learning (703-993-6200) or email stearns@gmu.edu. Please help spread the word by encouraging faculty and graduate instructors in your department or program to register and attend.

Like previous years, you will have a session host who will introduce you (referencing the bio information you provided for the conference proceedings—you can view your bio information in the ITLCP link above) and help by keeping time for your session. A few days before the conference, you will be emailed the name of your session host volunteer, should you wish to provide them with additional introduction material.


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Workshop, Panel, Teaching Activity Showcase, and Traditional Presenters

On the day of the conference, please plan to stop by your presentation room between 8:00am-9:00am or during lunch to test equipment and load your presentation materials. Please also plan to arrive at your session 5-10 minutes early to touch base with the session host introducing you and to address any last-minute setup concerns. As you tweak your presentation plan, we encourage you to make your session an active learning experience and plan time for interaction or discussion amongst the participants. Note: Rooms will be set up in pods to facilitate interaction with room for ~30-40 people. If you need to make any modifications to this, please plan to arrive right at the end of the previous session so you have time to adjust and allow a few minutes at end of session to return tables to original set up.

If you wish to publish any supplementary materials (links, handouts, videos, etc.) to be available pre- and/or post-conference, please submit through this link: http://library.gmu.edu/publishing/submit

Teaching Activity Showcases: Please note that there are two activity showcases per compact session (40 minute session), so each presenter has 15 minutes to present and 5 minutes for transition and audience questions. It’s a bit confusing in the visual schedule format as you will see a full 40 minute session listed with two teaching activities listed. In the conference proceedings, each teaching activity is listed separately so that you can fully archive your activity if you wish. In an effort to clarify your personal presentation time, we added the specific 15 minute window for your presentation by the room location information. (We apologize for this, but we have limited options in the online system.) It will be clearer in the print program for attendees. If you have questions, please let us know. stearns@gmu.edu The room will be set up with chairs in rows.

If you wish to publish any supplementary materials (links, handouts, videos, etc.) to be available pre- and/or post-conference, please submit through this link: http://library.gmu.edu/publishing/submit


Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) Lightning Talk and Roundtable Presenters

We are excited about this unique type of session! In order to make this session work logistically, we ask that you please send Kelly Schrum your slides before the conference–you should have received an email with directions from her, so that she can assemble all of the presenter slides into one continuous presentation. Because the presentations are being compiled, be sure to include your name and title on your first slide—the goal is to include images and no more than 7 words on each of the remaining slides.

How does a lightning talk work? Each presenter will only have 5 minutes to present their slides/study—it’s a bit of fun competition to see who can finish before the 5-minute bell signal. After everyone has presented (~45 minutes), then the session will shift into a roundtable session in which presenters will answer questions from the participants.

If you wish to publish any supplementary materials (links, handouts, videos, etc.) to be available pre and/or post conference, please submit through this link: http://library.gmu.edu/publishing/submit. If you would like to see an example lightning talk, please email llukes@gmu.edu.


Poster Presenters

We use OSCAR’s standard poster size of 48″ W and 36″ H (for tips and more information, please see their page on creating a poster). Unfortunately, we don’t have funds available to print posters. However, you can make an appointment to print your poster for FREE through SP@RC at Fenwick library through the “Print poster” request on their website Print Services. Reserve a spot as soon as you can! Also, Print Services can print posters on campus for a fee and numerous companies (e.g., Makesigns) can print/ship you the poster for a fee.

SUGGESTED POSTER GUIDELINES & TIPS

ITL may not be like your typical discipline conference poster session—be creative and use your imagination. Common approaches to an ITL poster include thinking of it as a big one page handout for people about your project or resource, a visual diagram of your thought process around designing teaching activities, or a visual signpost for starting an in person conversation. Below are some suggested guidelines based on past posters, but please feel free to go in your own direction.

Mason Resource Posters: Think of this a one page infographic handout for instructors (by submitting the PDF of you poster, you have a handout to link people to). Key information: name of resource; where to find it in person/online; why an instructor needs it/how it can help them; description of what it is; data/examples showing impact of using resource (optional)

Course or Activity Re/Design Posters: Think of this as a visual before/after demonstration of your activity/assignment or course plan. Key information: What learning problems were you trying to solve with this curriculum? (learning goals, outcomes); context (course/population/semester year); examples of the learning support activities/assignments that helped students build and practice skills and knowledge; examples of assessment activities to determine if the curriculum was successful at reaching learning goals; annotations or examples of what you were doing before vs. after and why you made those changes; consider including student sample work; lessons learned and/or tips and implications for others who will try it or adapt it

Curriculum Map Posters: Think of this as a visual roadmap of your course or your program’s curriculum. Key information: What learning problems were you trying to solve with this curriculum? (learning goals, outcomes); context (course/population/semester year); examples of the learning support activities/assignments that helped students build and practice skills and knowledge; examples of assessment activities to determine if the curriculum was successful at reaching learning goals; lessons learned and/or tips and implications for others who will try it or adapt it

Example Activity or Assignment Showcase Posters: Think of this as a visual ad for your activity. Key information: What learning problem were you trying to solve with this activity? (learning goals, outcomes); context (course/population/semester year); brief description of activity/assignment; samples of assignment and student work (what does this activity look like in practice); lessons learned and/or tips and implications for others who will try it or adapt it for their classes

SoTL Posters: Think of this as a typical research poster. Key information: Research question; context (course/population/semester year); methods; results; key take aways and implications for others in their teaching practice

Other: Use your imagination!

Looking for more tips on how to design your poster for this type of conference? Join us for a poster design workshop/drop-in on Friday, September 6, 10:00am-11:00am in Innovation Hall 427 or email Laura Lukes at llukes@gmu.edu to discuss ideas.

For the day of the conference, please plan to drop off your poster at registration at any time that day. We will provide easels, boards, and clips to attach your poster to the foam board—all you need to bring is your poster. We will also set up your poster if it is dropped off by 2:30pm the day-of.

During the poster session 4:15pm-5:45pm, we ask that you be by your poster during your assigned time at a minimum (see schedule for time range).

If you wish to publish any supplementary materials (links, handouts, videos, etc.) or a PDF of your poster to be available pre and/or post conference, please submit through this link: http://library.gmu.edu/publishing/submit


Faculty Conversation Leaders

You don’t need to prepare or submit anything. We simply ask that you check in with the volunteer coordinator at the registration desk some time between 7:45 and 8:00am and sit at particular tables in Dewberry when you arrive and get the conversation going as attendees arrive.

If you wish to share any of your relevant materials (links, handouts, videos, etc.) that may or do come up in these informal conversations, please submit through this link: http://library.gmu.edu/publishing/submit