On Demand Collection

 

ON DEMAND COLLECTION 

These “sessions” are designed to be a stand-alone online collection that will be posted before the start of the conference on Monday, September 20th and be available anytime to participants via the Sched Conference App and to the general public through the open-access ITL Conference Proceedings Online Journal.  


Preparing your On Demand submission: 

We will be offering presenter preparation sessions in July and August. Past presenters who prefer an asynchronous refresher of the most important details for the conference will have the option of watching a video instead. Please check your email for details.  

You may also find these resources helpful: 


Submitting Your Materials: 

Please follow the instructions under “Submitting Conference Materials” on the For Presenters page. If possible, we ask that you submit your materials by August 25th. The hard deadline for submitting materials is August 30th. We will try to post anything submitted after that date, but we cannot guarantee it will be posted in time for the live portion of the conference.   


ON DEMAND SESSION TYPES: 

  

Teaching & Learning Artifact w/Reflection or Annotation- New this year!  

 Your teaching and learning artifact could be:   

  • A description of an activity you do in class or ask your students to do outside of class  
  • An outline of your “lesson plan” for the day, the week, or for a module  
  • A copy of your syllabus  
  • A copy of an assignment you give your students  
  • A link to a teaching or learning tool you have your students use  
  • A copy of an assessment or grading rubric  
  • Something else?  

The idea is that you are sharing something that you use in your teaching or that your students use to learn AND you either annotate it or submit a separate reflection document/video in which you explain to other instructors why and how you use it (and any helpful hints or lessons learned).   

Note:  You are welcome to submit supplementary materials (e.g., syllabi, assignment directions, grading rubrics, activity description, list of top ten tips) to be published in the conference proceedings along with your artifact. To submit your materials, please follow the instructions under “Submitting Conference Materials” on the For Presenters page. 


Video Presentation (15 min. max) 

These On Demand videos could:   

  • Describe a learning support activity you ask your students to do,   
  • Demonstrate a tool you use to facilitate learning,   
  • Describe a teaching strategy or approach to classroom management,   
  • Explain how you have transformed an activity or course,   
  • Describe your curriculum (re)design process,   
  • Describe the types of instructional support resources available to instructors at Mason from your office or unit (e.g., Career Services, Writing Across the Curriculum), or  
  • Something else?   

The idea is that they are a brief overview—you could record a traditional talk, record your screen walking viewers step-by-step through directions on how to do something, etc.  

Note:  You are welcome to submit supplementary materials (e.g., syllabi, assignment directions, grading rubrics, activity description, list of top ten tips) to be published in the conference proceedings along with your video. To submit your materials, please follow the instructions under “Submitting Conference Materials” on the For Presenters page. 


Digital Poster Presentation   

Suggested Poster Guidelines and Tips: 

ITL may not be like your typical discipline conference poster session— 

Be creative with your design—feel free to create a traditional poster, an infographic, a hyperlinked PDF, etc.  Common approaches to an ITL poster include thinking of it as a big one-page handout for people about your project or resource, a visual diagram of your thought process around designing teaching activities, or a visual signpost for starting an in-person conversation. Below are some suggested guidelines based on past posters, but please feel free to go in your own direction. 

Mason Resource Posters: Think of this a one-page infographic handout for instructors. Key information: name of resource; where to find it in person/online; why an instructor needs it/how it can help them; description of what it is; data/examples showing impact of using resource (optional). 

Course or Activity Re/Design Posters: Think of this as a visual before/after demonstration of your activity/assignment or course plan. Key information: What learning problems were you trying to solve with this curriculum? (learning goals, outcomes); context (course/population/semester year); examples of the learning support activities/assignments that helped students build and practice skills and knowledge; examples of assessment activities to determine if the curriculum was successful at reaching learning goals; annotations or examples of what you were doing before vs. after and why you made those changes; consider including student sample work; lessons learned and/or tips and implications for others who will try it or adapt it. 

Curriculum Map Posters: Think of this as a visual roadmap of your course or your program’s curriculum. Key information: What learning problems were you trying to solve with this curriculum? (learning goals, outcomes); context (course/population/semester year); examples of the learning support activities/assignments that helped students build and practice skills and knowledge; examples of assessment activities to determine if the curriculum was successful at reaching learning goals; lessons learned and/or tips and implications for others who will try it or adapt it 

Example Activity or Assignment Showcase Posters: Think of this as a visual ad for your activity. Key information: What learning problem were you trying to solve with this activity? (learning goals, outcomes); context (course/population/semester year); brief description of activity/assignment; samples of assignment and student work (what does this activity look like in practice); lessons learned and/or tips and implications for others who will try it or adapt it for their classes 

SoTL Posters: Think of this as a typical research poster. Key information: Research question; context (course/population/semester year); methods; results; key take aways and implications for others in their teaching practice 

Other: Use your imagination! 

To submit your materials, please follow the instructions under “Submitting Conference Materials” on the For Presenters page. NOTE: You aren’t limited to one item.  If you wish to publish any supplementary materials (links, handouts, videos, etc.), please also submit through the above link. 


 Looking for more tips on how to design your On-Demand materials? Sign up for one of the On-Demand presentation preparation sessions or email the 2021 Conference Director, Katie Skipper at kskipper@gmu.edu to discuss ideas. 

Need Zoom help? 

Zoom tutorial videos and resources 

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